Lynching in the New South: Georgia and Virginia, 1880-1930

Winner of the Merle Curti Prize
Lynching in the New South is the winner of the Merle Curti Prize from the Organization of American History. It is an effort to make sense of a horrific tradition of racial violence that historians, at least until the 1990s, had barely studied.  Since the publication of Lynching in the New South, interest and scholarship on the topic has grown enormously.

“Brundage’s books are without question the best analysis of southern lynching yet written.” – Grace E. Hale, Southern Cultures

“Brundage’s examination of lynching in Georgia and Virginia immensely expands earlier interpretations and makes it evident that no single cause, whether psychological or socio-economic, can adequately explain the practices variations over time and space. It is a major work, unique in providing a perceptive comparative analysis of lynching in diverse regions. One hopes that sequels will follow, testing his analyses against lynchings in other southern states.” – Ann E. Pullen, Journal of Southern History

“The study of lynching reaches a new level of analysis in this impressive work of comparative history by W. Fitzhugh Brundage. Its strengths, especially its scope, insight, and plausibility, make this the best single study of lynching.” – Robert P. Ingalls, The American Historical Review

“Lynching in the New South  is far and away the best book ever written on the subject…Brundage is always in command of his material. A model of thorough research, this book should inspire new studies of vigilantism in other southern states.” – George C. Rable, The Journal of American History

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